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SPUR Team 6

SPUR Team 6

SPUR Team 6

SPUR TEAM 6

This report outlines the journey of a team aiming to improve how undergraduate students identify research opportunities that align with their profiles, focusing on developing their skills and satisfying their needs. Initially, the problem statement targeted matching students’ readiness and majors with research opportunities but evolved to emphasize better navigation of the URH database to match students’ profiles with opportunities holistically.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their readiness, align with their majors, and provide a positive experience.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Findings from Empathy and Interviews

  • Emphasize increasing awareness and targeting outreach for databases and opportunities.
  • Interviews with a broad range of stakeholders revealed the database is valued but viewed as STEM-heavy, with issues related to information overload and problematic filtering systems.

Secondary Research Insights

  • Other universities vary in database quality.
  • The Real portal needs more attention, with potential improvements in UI/UX and a suggestion to include tutorials for easier navigation.

Synthesis Matrix Summary

  • Due to varying stakeholder needs and awareness levels, there’s no single approach to engaging with research opportunities.
  • Key issues include limited awareness and available opportunities in the databases for non-STEM and international students.
DEFINE

Key Challenges Identified

  • General: Difficulty knowing where to start, siloed information, and a lack of awareness about research databases.
  • Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: There are challenges in finding formal opportunities and a misconception that research is predominantly STEM-focused.
  • International/Undocumented Students: Limited opportunities due to funding regulations.
  • Staff and Advisors: Lack of comprehensive knowledge about all available opportunities.

Updated Problem Statement 

The team refined the problem statement to focus on enhancing the navigation of the URH database to more effectively match undergraduate students with research opportunities that fit their comprehensive profiles.

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their profile, develop their skills, and satisfy their needs.

Summary and Key Takeaways

Significant Takeaways for Moving Forward with SPUR:

  • Macro-level: Addressing the overarching issue of awareness and communication to make the research opportunity search process more centralized and intuitive.
  • Micro-level (URH Specific): Focus on making the database more accessible to first-time users by reducing entry barriers, simplifying navigation, and decluttering information to avoid overwhelming users.

The team concluded that both macro and micro-level changes are crucial to making research opportunities more accessible and navigable for undergraduate students across all disciplines, thereby enhancing their academic and professional development.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Marie Sheneman, Phd., McNair Program Assistant Coordinator | RSRI Program Coordinator
  • Tod Oliviere, Director, Student Employment & Career Development
  • Megha Kumar, Student, Data Science/Math-CS
  • Nicole Gong, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Interdisciplinary Science)
  • Natalie Chiang, Student, Neurobiology & Cognitive Science
  • Sabrina Cheng, Student, Interdisciplinary Science, Comp/Arts, Junior Designer Program
Team 6 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 6

This report outlines the journey of a team aiming to improve how undergraduate students identify research opportunities that align with their profiles, focusing on developing their skills and satisfying their needs. Initially, the problem statement targeted matching students’ readiness and majors with research opportunities but evolved to emphasize better navigation of the URH database to match students’ profiles with opportunities holistically.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their readiness, align with their majors, and provide a positive experience.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Findings from Empathy and Interviews

  • Emphasize increasing awareness and targeting outreach for databases and opportunities.
  • Interviews with a broad range of stakeholders revealed the database is valued but viewed as STEM-heavy, with issues related to information overload and problematic filtering systems.

Secondary Research Insights

  • Other universities vary in database quality.
  • The Real portal needs more attention, with potential improvements in UI/UX and a suggestion to include tutorials for easier navigation.

Synthesis Matrix Summary

  • Due to varying stakeholder needs and awareness levels, there’s no single approach to engaging with research opportunities.
  • Key issues include limited awareness and available opportunities in the databases for non-STEM and international students.
DEFINE

Key Challenges Identified

  • General: Difficulty knowing where to start, siloed information, and a lack of awareness about research databases.
  • Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: There are challenges in finding formal opportunities and a misconception that research is predominantly STEM-focused.
  • International/Undocumented Students: Limited opportunities due to funding regulations.
  • Staff and Advisors: Lack of comprehensive knowledge about all available opportunities.

Updated Problem Statement 

The team refined the problem statement to focus on enhancing the navigation of the URH database to more effectively match undergraduate students with research opportunities that fit their comprehensive profiles.

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their profile, develop their skills, and satisfy their needs.

Summary and Key Takeaways

Significant Takeaways for Moving Forward with SPUR:

  • Macro-level: Addressing the overarching issue of awareness and communication to make the research opportunity search process more centralized and intuitive.
  • Micro-level (URH Specific): Focus on making the database more accessible to first-time users by reducing entry barriers, simplifying navigation, and decluttering information to avoid overwhelming users.

The team concluded that both macro and micro-level changes are crucial to making research opportunities more accessible and navigable for undergraduate students across all disciplines, thereby enhancing their academic and professional development.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Marie Sheneman, Phd., McNair Program Assistant Coordinator | RSRI Program Coordinator
  • Tod Oliviere, Director, Student Employment & Career Development
  • Megha Kumar, Student, Data Science/Math-CS
  • Nicole Gong, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Interdisciplinary Science)
  • Natalie Chiang, Student, Neurobiology & Cognitive Science
  • Sabrina Cheng, Student, Interdisciplinary Science, Comp/Arts, Junior Designer Program
Team 6 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 6

This report outlines the journey of a team aiming to improve how undergraduate students identify research opportunities that align with their profiles, focusing on developing their skills and satisfying their needs. Initially, the problem statement targeted matching students’ readiness and majors with research opportunities but evolved to emphasize better navigation of the URH database to match students’ profiles with opportunities holistically.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their readiness, align with their majors, and provide a positive experience.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Findings from Empathy and Interviews

  • Emphasize increasing awareness and targeting outreach for databases and opportunities.
  • Interviews with a broad range of stakeholders revealed the database is valued but viewed as STEM-heavy, with issues related to information overload and problematic filtering systems.

Secondary Research Insights

  • Other universities vary in database quality.
  • The Real portal needs more attention, with potential improvements in UI/UX and a suggestion to include tutorials for easier navigation.

Synthesis Matrix Summary

  • Due to varying stakeholder needs and awareness levels, there’s no single approach to engaging with research opportunities.
  • Key issues include limited awareness and available opportunities in the databases for non-STEM and international students.
DEFINE

Key Challenges Identified

  • General: Difficulty knowing where to start, siloed information, and a lack of awareness about research databases.
  • Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: There are challenges in finding formal opportunities and a misconception that research is predominantly STEM-focused.
  • International/Undocumented Students: Limited opportunities due to funding regulations.
  • Staff and Advisors: Lack of comprehensive knowledge about all available opportunities.

Updated Problem Statement 

The team refined the problem statement to focus on enhancing the navigation of the URH database to more effectively match undergraduate students with research opportunities that fit their comprehensive profiles.

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their profile, develop their skills, and satisfy their needs.

Summary and Key Takeaways

Significant Takeaways for Moving Forward with SPUR:

  • Macro-level: Addressing the overarching issue of awareness and communication to make the research opportunity search process more centralized and intuitive.
  • Micro-level (URH Specific): Focus on making the database more accessible to first-time users by reducing entry barriers, simplifying navigation, and decluttering information to avoid overwhelming users.

The team concluded that both macro and micro-level changes are crucial to making research opportunities more accessible and navigable for undergraduate students across all disciplines, thereby enhancing their academic and professional development.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Marie Sheneman, Phd., McNair Program Assistant Coordinator | RSRI Program Coordinator
  • Tod Oliviere, Director, Student Employment & Career Development
  • Megha Kumar, Student, Data Science/Math-CS
  • Nicole Gong, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Interdisciplinary Science)
  • Natalie Chiang, Student, Neurobiology & Cognitive Science
  • Sabrina Cheng, Student, Interdisciplinary Science, Comp/Arts, Junior Designer Program
Team 6 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

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