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SPUR Team 4

SPUR Team 4

SPUR Team 4

SPUR TEAM 4

In an era where undergraduate research experience is increasingly recognized as pivotal for academic and professional success, a team embarked on a comprehensive project to devise strategies that could enhance this journey for students. Their initiative addressed undergraduates’ core challenges in accessing and engaging with research opportunities, aiming to demystify the research process, reduce associated anxieties, and foster a more profound interest in scholarly inquiry.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Initially, the team articulated the problem: “How might we help undergraduate students better understand research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases interest, and improves research readiness?” This statement underscored the multifaceted barriers students encounter, from the complexity of research to emotional responses and the need for practical engagement.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Through empathy maps, stakeholder mappings, and observations, the team identified key issues affecting undergraduates, including the daunting nature of the research environment, limited accessibility to meaningful opportunities, and the prevalent sense of being overwhelmed and undervalued. 

  • Undergraduate Students: Diverse challenges in accessing research opportunities due to varied backgrounds (STEM, Non-STEM, First-Gen, etc.). Need awareness and resources tailored to their specific needs.
  • Graduate Students: Similar to undergraduates but with a focus on research for career advancement. Act as potential mentors for undergrads.
  • Faculty & Staff: Critical in guiding and informing students about research opportunities, providing mentorship and support across different disciplines.
  • Administrators (Chancellors, Deans, etc.): Strategic role in resource allocation and policy-making to enhance research accessibility.
  • Researchers & Employers (Academic, Corporate, etc.): Offer direct research opportunities but may need to improve outreach and inclusivity for diverse student groups.

Students from diverse backgrounds, including first-generation college attendees, expressed a particular need for enhanced mentorship and support in navigating these challenges.

DEFINE

The discovery phase led to a refined understanding of the problem. 

How might we help undergraduate students gain knowledge and mentorship about research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases confidence, and better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations?

  • Who: Undergraduate students
    • • Encompasses the individuals that we have identified as the various stakeholders
  • What: Gain knowledge and mentorship about research
    • Undergraduate students expressed specific aspects that they wanted to gain regarding research
    • More specific and expands upon the original need of “better understand research”
  • Why:
    • Driver: Better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations
    • Driver: Increases confidence
    • Stakeholders expressed a fear of rejection and a fear of not being knowledgeable enough
  • How: Feeling of anxiety
    • Stakeholders expressed their feelings of anxiety and stress regarding the application process

The team pinpointed the critical need for a supportive structure that facilitates access to research opportunities and cultivates a sense of belonging and value among undergraduates. They underscored the importance of mentorship, approachable networking, and confidence-building measures as essential components of this supportive ecosystem.

Complexity and Accessibility of Research:

  • There’s a consensus on the need to simplify and demystify research processes.
  • Staff focus on methodical instruction, while students seek more relatable and less intimidating access to research.

Emotional and Educational Response to Research:

  • Reducing anxiety is pivotal for both groups.
  • Staff may emphasize structured support, whereas students prefer a more nurturing and empathetic approach.

Engagement and Application in Learning:

  • Enhancing interest through real-world relevance and interactive learning is crucial.
  • Staff often view this through an academic lens, while students look for engaging, practical experiences that connect to their future careers.
Summary and Key Takeaways

The project illuminated the profound impact of research experiences on undergraduate students’ academic and professional trajectories. Key takeaways highlighted the essential role of simplifying the research process, addressing emotional barriers, and linking academic inquiry to real-world applications. Moreover, the findings emphasized the need for mentorship and a supportive community to enhance student confidence and preparedness for future challenges.

Most Significant Takeaways:

  • Students have a desire to gain research experience due to a desire to shape their future academic and professional paths
  • Students experience feelings of stress and anxiety about seeking out research
  • Students have a desire for mentorship

Important Ideas to Move Forward with SPUR:

  • Use methods that provide students with research readiness and
  • research opportunities
  • Focus on reducing feelings of anxiousness in students
  • Utilize UREs to provide mentorship and valuable experience for
  • students

In conclusion, by adopting a holistic and empathetic approach to understanding and addressing undergraduates’ challenges in engaging with research, the team laid the groundwork for transformative changes. These efforts promise to improve the quality of undergraduate research experiences and inspire a new generation of scholars equipped to navigate the complexities of the academic and professional worlds.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Katie Lin, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Evelyn Chen, Student, Speculative Design / Marketing
  • Siya Randhawa, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Neda Emdad, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )/ Junior Designer Program
Team 4 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 4

In an era where undergraduate research experience is increasingly recognized as pivotal for academic and professional success, a team embarked on a comprehensive project to devise strategies that could enhance this journey for students. Their initiative addressed undergraduates’ core challenges in accessing and engaging with research opportunities, aiming to demystify the research process, reduce associated anxieties, and foster a more profound interest in scholarly inquiry.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Initially, the team articulated the problem: “How might we help undergraduate students better understand research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases interest, and improves research readiness?” This statement underscored the multifaceted barriers students encounter, from the complexity of research to emotional responses and the need for practical engagement.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Through empathy maps, stakeholder mappings, and observations, the team identified key issues affecting undergraduates, including the daunting nature of the research environment, limited accessibility to meaningful opportunities, and the prevalent sense of being overwhelmed and undervalued. 

  • Undergraduate Students: Diverse challenges in accessing research opportunities due to varied backgrounds (STEM, Non-STEM, First-Gen, etc.). Need awareness and resources tailored to their specific needs.
  • Graduate Students: Similar to undergraduates but with a focus on research for career advancement. Act as potential mentors for undergrads.
  • Faculty & Staff: Critical in guiding and informing students about research opportunities, providing mentorship and support across different disciplines.
  • Administrators (Chancellors, Deans, etc.): Strategic role in resource allocation and policy-making to enhance research accessibility.
  • Researchers & Employers (Academic, Corporate, etc.): Offer direct research opportunities but may need to improve outreach and inclusivity for diverse student groups.

Students from diverse backgrounds, including first-generation college attendees, expressed a particular need for enhanced mentorship and support in navigating these challenges.

DEFINE

The discovery phase led to a refined understanding of the problem. 

How might we help undergraduate students gain knowledge and mentorship about research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases confidence, and better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations?

  • Who: Undergraduate students
    • • Encompasses the individuals that we have identified as the various stakeholders
  • What: Gain knowledge and mentorship about research
    • Undergraduate students expressed specific aspects that they wanted to gain regarding research
    • More specific and expands upon the original need of “better understand research”
  • Why:
    • Driver: Better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations
    • Driver: Increases confidence
    • Stakeholders expressed a fear of rejection and a fear of not being knowledgeable enough
  • How: Feeling of anxiety
    • Stakeholders expressed their feelings of anxiety and stress regarding the application process

The team pinpointed the critical need for a supportive structure that facilitates access to research opportunities and cultivates a sense of belonging and value among undergraduates. They underscored the importance of mentorship, approachable networking, and confidence-building measures as essential components of this supportive ecosystem.

Complexity and Accessibility of Research:

  • There’s a consensus on the need to simplify and demystify research processes.
  • Staff focus on methodical instruction, while students seek more relatable and less intimidating access to research.

Emotional and Educational Response to Research:

  • Reducing anxiety is pivotal for both groups.
  • Staff may emphasize structured support, whereas students prefer a more nurturing and empathetic approach.

Engagement and Application in Learning:

  • Enhancing interest through real-world relevance and interactive learning is crucial.
  • Staff often view this through an academic lens, while students look for engaging, practical experiences that connect to their future careers.
Summary and Key Takeaways

The project illuminated the profound impact of research experiences on undergraduate students’ academic and professional trajectories. Key takeaways highlighted the essential role of simplifying the research process, addressing emotional barriers, and linking academic inquiry to real-world applications. Moreover, the findings emphasized the need for mentorship and a supportive community to enhance student confidence and preparedness for future challenges.

Most Significant Takeaways:

  • Students have a desire to gain research experience due to a desire to shape their future academic and professional paths
  • Students experience feelings of stress and anxiety about seeking out research
  • Students have a desire for mentorship

Important Ideas to Move Forward with SPUR:

  • Use methods that provide students with research readiness and
  • research opportunities
  • Focus on reducing feelings of anxiousness in students
  • Utilize UREs to provide mentorship and valuable experience for
  • students

In conclusion, by adopting a holistic and empathetic approach to understanding and addressing undergraduates’ challenges in engaging with research, the team laid the groundwork for transformative changes. These efforts promise to improve the quality of undergraduate research experiences and inspire a new generation of scholars equipped to navigate the complexities of the academic and professional worlds.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Katie Lin, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Evelyn Chen, Student, Speculative Design / Marketing
  • Siya Randhawa, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Neda Emdad, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )/ Junior Designer Program
Team 4 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 4

In an era where undergraduate research experience is increasingly recognized as pivotal for academic and professional success, a team embarked on a comprehensive project to devise strategies that could enhance this journey for students. Their initiative addressed undergraduates’ core challenges in accessing and engaging with research opportunities, aiming to demystify the research process, reduce associated anxieties, and foster a more profound interest in scholarly inquiry.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Initially, the team articulated the problem: “How might we help undergraduate students better understand research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases interest, and improves research readiness?” This statement underscored the multifaceted barriers students encounter, from the complexity of research to emotional responses and the need for practical engagement.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Through empathy maps, stakeholder mappings, and observations, the team identified key issues affecting undergraduates, including the daunting nature of the research environment, limited accessibility to meaningful opportunities, and the prevalent sense of being overwhelmed and undervalued. 

  • Undergraduate Students: Diverse challenges in accessing research opportunities due to varied backgrounds (STEM, Non-STEM, First-Gen, etc.). Need awareness and resources tailored to their specific needs.
  • Graduate Students: Similar to undergraduates but with a focus on research for career advancement. Act as potential mentors for undergrads.
  • Faculty & Staff: Critical in guiding and informing students about research opportunities, providing mentorship and support across different disciplines.
  • Administrators (Chancellors, Deans, etc.): Strategic role in resource allocation and policy-making to enhance research accessibility.
  • Researchers & Employers (Academic, Corporate, etc.): Offer direct research opportunities but may need to improve outreach and inclusivity for diverse student groups.

Students from diverse backgrounds, including first-generation college attendees, expressed a particular need for enhanced mentorship and support in navigating these challenges.

DEFINE

The discovery phase led to a refined understanding of the problem. 

How might we help undergraduate students gain knowledge and mentorship about research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases confidence, and better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations?

  • Who: Undergraduate students
    • • Encompasses the individuals that we have identified as the various stakeholders
  • What: Gain knowledge and mentorship about research
    • Undergraduate students expressed specific aspects that they wanted to gain regarding research
    • More specific and expands upon the original need of “better understand research”
  • Why:
    • Driver: Better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations
    • Driver: Increases confidence
    • Stakeholders expressed a fear of rejection and a fear of not being knowledgeable enough
  • How: Feeling of anxiety
    • Stakeholders expressed their feelings of anxiety and stress regarding the application process

The team pinpointed the critical need for a supportive structure that facilitates access to research opportunities and cultivates a sense of belonging and value among undergraduates. They underscored the importance of mentorship, approachable networking, and confidence-building measures as essential components of this supportive ecosystem.

Complexity and Accessibility of Research:

  • There’s a consensus on the need to simplify and demystify research processes.
  • Staff focus on methodical instruction, while students seek more relatable and less intimidating access to research.

Emotional and Educational Response to Research:

  • Reducing anxiety is pivotal for both groups.
  • Staff may emphasize structured support, whereas students prefer a more nurturing and empathetic approach.

Engagement and Application in Learning:

  • Enhancing interest through real-world relevance and interactive learning is crucial.
  • Staff often view this through an academic lens, while students look for engaging, practical experiences that connect to their future careers.
Summary and Key Takeaways

The project illuminated the profound impact of research experiences on undergraduate students’ academic and professional trajectories. Key takeaways highlighted the essential role of simplifying the research process, addressing emotional barriers, and linking academic inquiry to real-world applications. Moreover, the findings emphasized the need for mentorship and a supportive community to enhance student confidence and preparedness for future challenges.

Most Significant Takeaways:

  • Students have a desire to gain research experience due to a desire to shape their future academic and professional paths
  • Students experience feelings of stress and anxiety about seeking out research
  • Students have a desire for mentorship

Important Ideas to Move Forward with SPUR:

  • Use methods that provide students with research readiness and
  • research opportunities
  • Focus on reducing feelings of anxiousness in students
  • Utilize UREs to provide mentorship and valuable experience for
  • students

In conclusion, by adopting a holistic and empathetic approach to understanding and addressing undergraduates’ challenges in engaging with research, the team laid the groundwork for transformative changes. These efforts promise to improve the quality of undergraduate research experiences and inspire a new generation of scholars equipped to navigate the complexities of the academic and professional worlds.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Katie Lin, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Evelyn Chen, Student, Speculative Design / Marketing
  • Siya Randhawa, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Neda Emdad, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )/ Junior Designer Program
Team 4 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

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